Not For Chickens: Balance

Allow me to rant: promoted tweets are pretty much the worst. Last week, it was to the point where I almost quit the word bird. In particular, their decision that I just needed to know everything there was to know about keto diets.

And more importantly, it wanted me to know that there were way to make all my favourite sinful indulgences keto-compliant.

Those of you who follow my Twitter (@caredge) know that I responded with my favourite, and likely the most popular, Michael Polan quote:

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

Michael Polan – In Defense of Food

It’s really simple advice. But it’s also ridiculously hard when you realize that “food” means actual food and not these highly processed items.

But that processing? That’s pretty much the reason I am terribly opposed to a lot of these highly restrictive diets. You are not altering your eating habits as much as you are trying to trick your brain into believing you are eating that thing you love, when really it’s just a bastardization of it. While, again, I don’t so much endorse highly restrictive diets, I had to give Whole 30 some respect when I read a post of theirs that made me both giggle and nod in agreement:

To use an analogy we can all (probably) understand, the Paleo-ification of poor food choices is a little bit like having sex with your pants on. (source)

We’re not training our taste buds to really appreciate actually healthy food. We’re just teaching it that we can have our cake and eat it too, so long as we use coconut flour, a powdered low carb sweetener, xantham gum, and all the extracts we can find to mask the fact that low carb sweeteners taste like melted plastic.

But I’m not perfect. I’m far from perfect. I mock all these extreme diets for allowing people to live in the illusion that they are eating healthily, when me? Maybe not so much.

But I’m trying. I’m trying to find that balance between eating the junk that I love, and embracing the whole “eat food.  Not too much. Mostly plants”. And sometimes that means eating such a delicious quinoa salad that I can’t wait to make it again. And sometimes that means making pizza from scratch, and serving it with a side of salad (and a glass of wine). It’s recognizing not every meal is going to win the health awards, but it’s making sure that overall, ya, we’re doing all right.


Categories: The new identity | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Not For Chickens: Balance

  1. “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” —> I love this so much. I try to live–and eat!–mostly in moderation, but that means indulging every now and then to fully enjoy and embrace life. I’m lucky in that I’ve never had any hangups about food. I love it (don’t get me wrong) but I chew slowly and mindfully, because my family is European and we did a lot of talking during dinners and gesticulating wildly while eating (lol). I dunno if there’s actually a correlation there, but whenever I go out to eat with people, I’ve noticed that I’m always the last to finish eating so maybe. Who knows. Mostly plants–it’s sound advice 🙂

  2. We’re going to be working on some diet changes too at our house but I think it’ll be a slow transition, like you said, it’s about balance, if we want a pizza, maybe throw a salad on the side. Fad diets will never cut it. And yes, promoted tweets are the worst!

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